Your rights and how to complain about ferries and cruises

Ferries/cruises
The Consumer Rights Act 2015 was applied to ferries from 1st October 2016. You are now entitled to services carried out with reasonable skill and care. If they are not then you should be able to gain redress.

If your ferry service is cancelled or departure is delayed for more than 90 minutes, you are entitled to either an alternative sailing at the earliest opportunity at no additional cost or reimbursement of the ticket price which should be paid within seven days. If you choose an alternative crossing, you’re still entitled to claim compensation for the delay to your original journey.

While you wait (when delayed for more than 90 minutes or it is expected to be cancelled) you are entitled to meals and refreshments if they can be reasonably supplied even if the reason is bad weather.

If an overnight stay is required due to the delay/cancellation then the ferry or cruise operator must offer you accommodation free of charge, if possible. This can be on board or ashore.

Your ferry company can offer alternatives such as permitting you to make your own separate plans to travel and reimburse your expenses. No overnight accommodation has to be offered or costs reimbursed if the delay is caused by weather conditions endangering the safe operation of the ship.

For all things complaining holidays see All you need to know about booking/complaining about holidays/flights

For more advice, tips and templates for complaining  see GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

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The Retail Ombudsman is no more

Former “Ombudsman” loses the right to use respected title

Reblogged from http://ceoemail.blogspot.com

The Retail Ombudsman (TRO) is no more. The private company, set up in 2015 to
provide dispute resolution for consumers, has lost the right to use the respected
title of “Ombudsman”.

TRO has resigned from the Ombudsman Association (OA), its trade body, for reasons
that remain unclear. The resignation means that it is no longer allowed to use the
“Ombudsman” title. The company is in the process of dropping the title during the
course of this week and will now operate as a provider of alternative dispute
resolution (ADR) services, outside of the ombudsman system.

Companies House rules stipulate that companies using the “Ombudsman” title must be
members of the OA. The OA seeks to ensure the quality of its members through a
periodic revalidation process. However, rather than complete the recent
revalidation process, TRO resigned just as that process was concluding. Neither
the OA nor TRO would comment on the circumstances which have caused the
resignation.

Privately-run ombudsman services have been a feature of the consumer landscape in
the UK for several years. However, the system has been criticised for being
difficult to use, lacking transparency and not having a single point of contact
for consumers. Many of the largest high-street retailers, including ASDA, Tesco
and Morrisons, had refused to co-operate with TRO, preferring to use their own
internal complaints process or another ombudsman or ADR scheme.

The appointment, regulation and management of private-sector ombudsmen is
fragmented, dealt with through a complicated combination of the Department for
Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the Chartered Trading Standards
Institute (CTSI), the Ombudsman Association (OA) and Companies House. BEIS would
not comment on TRO’s loss of ombudsman status, instead deferring to the Companies
House press office, who in turn have not provided any substantive comment.

Marcus Williamson, the editor of consumer information website CEOemail.com, who
has been monitoring private ADR since 2014, said: “The behaviour of TRO – in
resigning during the OA revalidation process – demonstrates once again that a
retail ombudsman role is too sensitive to be handled by the private sector. It is
time that retail was given a government-run ombudsman system, in a similar way to
the financial sector.”

Williamson – who co-authored the June 2016 report Ombudsman Omnishambles with
Helen Dewdney – suggested that TRO’s management had made a number of fundamental
errors of judgement in its 2 1/2 years of operation. This included, he noted,
employing a convicted criminal as its communications director and having as
ombudsman an individual who had breached the Companies Act on multiple occasions.
Williamson believes that OA and CTSI should insist on a “fit and proper person”
test prior to allowing any individual to take on an ombudsman role.

The Retail Ombudman had been run by Dean Dunham, a solicitor, former restauranteur
and former celebrity lawyer, who established TRO in early 2015. He claimed to have
15,000 retail companies as members of TRO and 100 staff, although the company’s
accounts filed at Companies House do not support these figures. He also had a
regular slot on the London-based LBC talk radio channel, offering consumer advice,
and a Sunday Mirror column.

References

Companies House rules on use of Ombudsman title
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/incorporation-and-names/annex-a-sensitive-words-and-expressions-or-words-that-could-imply-a-connection-with-government
(see paragraph 1.86)

TRO members list
https://www.theretailombudsman.org.uk/tro-list/

TRO staff numbers and retail members
https://www.theretailombudsman.org.uk/why-the-retail-ombudsman-is-the-best-adr-choice-for-small-retailers/

Ombudsman Omnishambles report
http://ceoemail.com/ombudsman-omnishambles.pdf

Companies formerly run by Dean Dunham
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/officers/yEuzy-BYjZK6erw9hbUGFZ1Y4SU/appointments

Accounts for Consumer Dispute Resolution Limited, trading as The Retail Ombudsman
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/09189773/filing-history

Contact at the OA
Nick Bennett, Chairman of the OA
Nick.Bennett@ombudsman-wales.org.uk

Contact at TRO
Dean Dunham, former ombudsman
dean.dunham@theretailombudsman.org.uk

Contact for this press releae

Marcus Williamson
Email: marcus@connectotel.com

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Tesco insect in raspberries!

Time for a Tesco complaint story. Well would be a shame not to wouldn’t it? For those new here see History with Tesco!

So, there I was down at my Mum’s and she bought some raspberries and cream. She did this little shriek when she nearly put some sort of flying insect thing in her mouth ‘cos it was stuck on a raspberry. Now, given that I once found an insect in Tesco rice a few years back and how Tesco dealt with it – I refused to take back to the store as not knowing if it would get “lost” in the post. Anyway, I sent it for them to investigate and they found out what insect it was and gave me £30 for my trouble. This was in Clarke’s day and I wondered if things had changed.

Now, having met Dave Lewis the group CEO a few times including interviewing him last year I thought I’d email him. Normally I wouldn’t expect a CEO to respond directly but I thought well he knows me and I’ll use my normal humour and see if it makes him smile.

See if it does you?

Dave

Before your time at Tesco I bought some rice from Tesco with an insect alive in it. I named him Phillip. Insect in rice.

But now there’s big trouble because I’m down at my Mum’s and she bought some raspberries from Tesco. (Taunton). Raspberries and cream we had and she just stopped short of putting some in her mouth as some thing very big with lots of wiggily wriggly legs crawled out of a raspberry. It may have had wings but there was a bit of a cream crust so can’t be sure. Was hoping to film him crawling but my mother suffocated him with some Tesco finest clotted cream. Not a bad way for Mike to go I suppose but even so Tesco has upset my Mum now and so, well, that has to be at least an email to the CEO obviously! She was very cross which means I am. But I won’t bother with the stuff that I usually put in these things regarding legal stuff and redress because I trust you to do right by my mum!

I have Mike ready to post to Tesco for testing to see what it was and where it came from. If he has wings we may need to change the name to Saint Michael.

Happy Easter

Kind regards
Helen

Well we thought it was funny. I’d normally do the kind of email that always gets results regarding Consumer Rights Act 2015 etc etc. But got the usual email from the executive office. They took a long time getting back to me with no reference to the story. Miserable whatsits. They told the supplier but didn’t want the raspberries to check what it was. They gave my mum £20.

Well my Mum was pleased….

Tesco Group CEO email or Tesco UK CEO contact details  should you need them.

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All you need to know about credit score rating

 

 

Guest post  by James Jones is Experian’s Head of Consumer Affairs

 

When did you last check your credit score?
Despite now being free, less than half (45%) of British adults have ever taken the time to find out their credit score. So I guess there’s a pretty good chance you answered ‘never’ to the title question, which I think is a shame. Let me explain what your credit score is and why it’s important. And while we’re on the subject, I’ll try to set the record straight on some popular credit untruths too.

Your credit score is an assessment of your credit report (aka credit history), which is your recent track record managing a wide variety of credit accounts such as loans, credit cards, mortgages, mobile phone contracts, car finance, current account and even some regular household bills such as energy, water and broadband.

Ask a lender for credit and it’ll get your permission to check your credit report to help it predict how you’ll behave in the future. There are three agencies in the UK that compile credit reports on people my employer Experian, Equifax and Callcredit. Your report at each agency can differ as we don’t all work with the same credit providers.

To help lenders process large volumes of applications quickly and fairly your credit report is usually turned into a credit score. This indicates the probability you’ll miss future payments based on your credit track record. The higher the score the lower the risk. You can ask each agency for a copy of your report and for a guide credit score. It won’t be the same score a lender uses but will give you a decent idea where you stand.

The Experian Credit Score is calculated on a scale of 0-999. A score of 961 or higher is classed as excellent and around 30% of Experian’s customers have an excellent score. As a result, they should be able to access cheap borrowing from a wide range of providers. On the other hand, a poor score can leave you struggling to be accepted for credit and, if you are successful, paying over the odds for the privilege.

So, it can certainly pay to take a little time to find out your score and, if it leaves room for improvement, to explore how you might be able to improve it.

The three agencies have lots of advice on their websites on building a great score and they can give your personal tips if you get in touch. Services like Experian CreditMatcher can also show you which credit products you’re likely to be accepted for based on your current credit score, removing a lot of the guesswork from applying for credit.

To help make sure your credit score is right on the money, let me sign off by leaving you with my five top tips on getting your credit score in good shape, plus the top credit score untruths.

Top tips for a tip top credit score
1 Build a positive track record – use some credit and don’t miss payments.

2 Don’t max out credit cards, ideally keeping balances below 50% of the limit​. In fact, the lower the better.

3 Space out new credit applications to avoid looking needy.

4 Decouple your report from other people’s if they’re no longer linked to you (eg an ex-partner).

5 Register to vote – it helps ID checks and can give your credit score a boost.

Top five credit untruths
1 There’s a credit blacklist – nope, there isn’t one. Credit reports are factual and mostly positive.

2 Previous occupants affect your credit rating – not the case. Someone else’s credit history can only come into play if you’ve linked up (usually via joint credit with a partner).

3 Credit refusal damages your score – no it doesn’t and the outcome isn’t even shown on your report, just the fact that you applied. But do avoid multiple applications (see pt. 3 above).

4 Credit reference agencies decide who gets credit – not at all. We do help but only the lender can decide which customers to accept.

5 Checking your credit report (or your score) harms your credit score – absolutely not! You can do this as often as you like – so what are you waiting for?

About the author. James Jones is Experian’s Head of Consumer Affairs and leads the company’s public education programme, advising people on, for example, credit reports, credit ratings and identity fraud. James is frequently on TV and radio, and regularly answers people’s questions through both traditional media and online via the Experian website, Facebook and Twitter. He began his career at Experian in 1992 after graduating from Cambridge. He loves travel, sport and real ale, and regularly combines all three by following Nottingham Forest and Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club.

 

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