Top 10 Tips Avoid Complaints!

The Complaining Cow’s Ten Top Tips for the Complained Against!

Search well and you can find help in improving your customer service and experience, sales etc. But perhaps it’s time you looked at what a seasoned complainer gets most annoyed about, the annoyances you don’t know about and the people you don’t reach when gaining feedback and then what you can do about it?! Perhaps a customer is best placed to advise you on how to improve the customer experience and show who you are missing when you gain feedback and how you can improve your sales.

1) Dealing with customers on the telephone

If someone rings to complain then they may well be irate and/or rude. I advise people never to ‘phone, only to write, unless absolutely necessary. This is because it is easy to get really angry, forget your points and be rude. You have the right not to deal with someone if they are being rude. I say this as an experienced complainer. Try to calm the caller down but be assertive. Recognise that they have a problem they wish to discuss but state that you will only listen if they please calm down so that you can help. You cannot help until the emotion has been dealt with.

Staff should always be polite and apologise where necessary. You win people round that way. But it must be genuine, we can all tell when it’s just being said to shut us up!

2) Empower your staff

Nothing frustrates the complainer more than having to repeat their complaint. Train your staff well. Ensure that they are equipped with the right knowledge and tools to deal with complaints both at face to face contact with customers and in the Customer Service department.

If your staff are working face to face train them to gauge when someone wants to talk and when they don’t. Absolute pet hate of many customers! Think about which staff will use their initiative and when they should be encouraged to do so. Also what they will do with “Rules”.

“Have a nice Day” NO thank you

So often my complaints have been about staff not knowing the answer or giving misinformation. Obviously at times you will have new staff! Make sure that there are always more knowledgeable people easily to hand. This is a common problem.

The best quality you can ever look for when recruiting is common sense! Everything else comes from good training and looking after your staff well. Looked after staff look after customers.

3) Always ask for clarity/more information so that it is easier to resolve the problem

Having written countless complaints for lots of people where they have previously failed to gain redress, I have seen time and time again that people have not given enough information – it’s badly written or things just aren’t clear. Don’t deal with a complaint as quickly as possible. Go back and ask for more information and/or clarity if necessary. It could well be that there is some really useful feedback for you if you are open and prepared to find out more.

Often companies try and deal with the initial complaint and make more problems for themselves because they have assumed something incorrectly. If in doubt, ask a colleague then ask the customer, never ever assume. You’ll see examples of how this piece of advice should have been followed in some of my more protracted complaints!

4) Social media

Twitter and other Social media streams may be good to communicate with customers but give the staff the tools to be able to do the job properly. Good training and good management support with efficient and effective systems and processes to follow and test them. I’ve used Twitter to try and resolve a complaint and the staff tweeting didn’t investigate properly and made the matter worse.

Remember the power of social media. Even ignoring one tweet can lose you business.

5) Improve your internal and external communication

You’ll see throughout the Blog posts, that one big common factor when making the biggest and/or longest complaints is the poor communication between departments. So often, once the CEO’s office has been contacted it is found that one department didn’t pass on a piece of information to another. Set up adequate systems and test them appropriately.

6) Set up meaningful log systems

Log your letters, phone calls and emails regarding complaints. Ensure adequate records and systems are kept of categories of complaints so that you can monitor and improve on all areas including those you didn’t know about! Keep records of which ones you have had to pay out the most/frequency/amount. Keep records of how the complaint came in, whether it was escalated with sections for why etc. as this in itself gives rise to another complaint. You will be able to see what types of complaints are fewest but costing you the most and the complaints which are the most frequent so that you can address appropriately. Ensure your system is filled out with every complaint that comes in. Set up regular predetermined dates to address each category and revisit for patterns/changes. Obviously you will need to keep records of what has been done to address issues to date. You will need to have very large systems if you have several stores of course!

7) Feedback tools warnings

Don’t use gimmicks for gaining feedback. Utterly pointless. One store I sometimes shop in has put in one of those interactive screens where you tap on the answer. Some people will just keep pressing a negative button skewing your figures and children just press it to get the sounds. It’s also insulting to your customers. You can’t possibly use that feedback and we know it.

You can use Mystery Shoppers but be aware of the many limitations. The Complaining Cow is a Mystery Shopper! I registered with many but I’ve done very little mainly because the pay is poor and I was only doing it for a bit of fun and pocket money! But I can tell you that very few test their shoppers before they go out on assignments and anyone can apply with any standard of education. I’m sure Mystery Shopping companies will tell you that anyone can apply but not everyone is accepted! This may be true but the rates for jobs do not equate to anything near even a low level manager’s salary so you’ll see my point. Also, what’s the point of sending someone to buy a pot of margarine and take it back? It’s not real. Use a real scenario, the real family shop. What’s the point of asking a Mystery Shopper to undertake a flight when what you really want to see is what a family who really fly with you thinks? It’s the same with meals and take-aways. The differences in experience are vast. There are numerous ways of doing this! There are more reservations discussed in this Blog.

When you are using feedback forms, complaint letters/phone calls/emails you are actually only reaching a limited type of customer. Think about it. People who are prone to wanting to give their opinions are like me! How are you are going to reach the people who aren’t assertive, don’t give their opinions willingly etc? These people’s views are just as important and, dare I say it, possibly more important than mine! That’s because these are the people who will not use your store again and will not tell you why. You don’t know what you don’t know! A friend of mine often tells me to hold back if I don’t like something in a shop. She is non confrontational and too lazy or doesn’t have the time to write a letter of complaint or write with suggestions on any feedback forms! However, she does walk out of shops, they DO lose her custom but they don’t know who they lost or why. For example, Marks and Spencer haven’t been doing too well lately. One of the things they may have done to address this is pack more clothes in. Perhaps an “Expert” told them that they needed to put more “stuff” in the stores to sell more. No-one asked the customers though did they? My friend who used to regularly spend hundreds of pounds in M & S now hates shopping there. Why? You used to be able to see through and over rails and move about easily. Now, it’s common to barge into people looking at the next rail and you can’t see where you need to go if in a rush. Twice we have left early because the place annoyed us and the last time we heard a mother say to her daughter “Let’s get out of this place it’s too crowded.” So, they lost 3 customers in as many minutes. Do you think the powers that be in Marks and Spencer know?

Remember, if you ask a customer if their expectations were exceeded and they say “yes” that they might have had a really bad experience before so anything is better! Choose your questions carefully to get you the information need not the information you want to hear.

8) Gain feedback creatively

Look for creative ways of getting feedback, even risky ways. Just because you use feedback forms, Twitter, Facebook and direct feedback through complaints etc. doesn’t mean that you are getting the most useful or best information. Yes use tried and tested methods but if you want to gain over your competitors why not do something different? Try inviting a group of people who have recently complained about your service to tell you what they think of your store/service/organisation! This will be risky, you are going to meet/deal with people who used up your time and annoyed you and you may get given a mile long list but these are the people who complain, these are the people who have no problem telling you how you could improve, these are the voices of the people who use you. Surely you need to hear them? Ask someone from outside your organisation to facilitate the session to ensure that you really get the information you need.

Guide customers with humour!

I haven’t seen children and young people mentioned on any customer service website or advice website! Are you a family friendly organisation? Ask the children and young people! They generally don’t write letters of complaint (although mine is encouraged to and he’s only 4years old!) they don’t tend to fill out feedback forms and younger ones aren’t using Social Media. But again, their views are important, they are aiding their parents/carers in deciding where to shop etc. Is that another untapped resource that you have been ignoring in gaining your feedback? How are you going to get their views? Creatively! (Not using your existing staff because different skills are needed. You wouldn’t ask your customer care team to undertake youth or playwork would you?!) How you do this needs to be planned carefully and appropriately, with due care and attention to legal issues, experience and knowledge of the people undertaking this work for you.

9) Reward customers for their feedback

Reward your customers for their feedback. You are doing that when you send goodwill gestures to those who complain to you. (So you should, as they have taken the time and trouble to bring the matter to your attention and if you use the feedback well it will save you far more in the long run). You pay your senior managers a high wage and you may even pay for consultants but the best people to tell you how you can improve are your customers so reward them for telling you and they will remain loyal.

Remember the general adage “Happy customers tell 3 of their friends, unhappy ones tell 10”. However, with the development of Review sites, Internet Forums and Social Media the figures are now much bigger!!! How far you go in making amends can make a huge difference. If you remain unconvinced read my Blog! How many people am I telling about service?!

10) Thank your customers!

Always respond to customers. Thank them for their feedback. It doesn’t matter how big or small your organisation, that customer, however frustrating/persistent s/he may have been, could have given you the best piece of information to improve your sales! It could have been the one thing that numerous customers are annoyed about. There are many ways you can and should do this too!!

A little positive thinking about complaints and feedback can improve your customer service and sales enormously and if you need more help with creativity and a different angle look here!

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