Think before you sign – top 10 tips for saving on subscriptions

Think before you sign

Don’t fritter away your hard-earned money on unwanted subscriptions

top 10 tips for savings on subscriptions with picture of contract

In November 2017, Citizens Advice research revealed that in just three months consumers spent an average of £160 on unwanted subscriptions, including gym memberships, television and online streaming services. The consumer organisation also found that between June and August 2017, 9 out of 10 people were initially refused by companies when cancellation of an unwanted subscription was requested.

So what are your rights and the best ways to deal with these subscriptions? Here are my top 10 tips.

1) Be aware of the “free” and very cheap trials of subscriptions. Most, if not all, will ask for payment information when you sign up. Set yourself a reminder to cancel a day before the first payment is due.

2) Check the cancellation rights before signing up to anything but be aware that you may still be able to challenge these in certain circumstances.

3) Under the Consumer Contracts Regulations 2013, you are entitled to a 14 day “cooling off” period, so if you have signed up to something off premises (e.g. online) you can cancel with no penalty.

4) Under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, consumers are protected from unfair contracts. So, for example, if a company says that you must give 6 months’ notice to cancel a subscription, that would be unfair.

5) The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2014 state that companies must provide accurate and sufficient information for consumers to make a purchasing decision. For a practice to be unfair under these rules, they must harm, or be likely to harm, the economic interests of the average consumer. For example, when a shopper makes a purchasing decision he or she would not have made had he or she been given accurate information.

6) If you are going to sign up to a subscription, try and use Direct Debit where possible. With Direct Debit, a company cannot change the regular payment amount. Using a debit card or credit card is known as a Continuous Payment Authority which can be of varying amounts which can be changed without your consent.

7) When you cancel with the company, also inform your bank to ensure that the subscription payment is cancelled. You will then also be covered by the Direct Debit Guarantee, which ensures a full and immediate refund of the amount paid from your bank or building society if a mistake is made.

8) Check that the site is genuine. The website address should begin with “https”, have a padlock symbol, a full correspondence address (not a PO box number) and any trade logos should be genuine. Also, search the Internet for reviews and check for warning signs like lots of grammatical errors or a domain name that uses a well-known brand/product but isn’t the official website or ends in .net or .org as these are rarely used for online shopping sites. You can also check who registered the domain via the com website.

9) If you want to cancel, do so quickly and in writing so you have evidence. If you are prepared to discuss the matter because you want to haggle for example, telephone helpline numbers cannot cost the consumer more than the basic rate, so no 084 and 087 numbers. If companies do use these then they are in breach of the The Consumer Contract (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 and Ofcom regulations.

10) When writing to cancel, provide all details of the policy/memberships etc., dates of subscriptions and request that the cancellation is made with immediate effect. Name the laws above and describe how the company is in breach, if relevant.

More at How to challenge terms & conditions (even those you’ve agreed)

Top 20 Tips How to Complain!

How to Complain: The Essential Consumer Guide to Getting Refunds, Redress and Results!

 

For masses more information, advice, tips, consumer laws and template letters get the GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

 

 

 

Don’t let faulty electrical products give you a customer service shock

Don’t let faulty electrical products give you a customer service shock

After Black Friday (week?!) and Cyber Monday and with many electrical bargains snapped up what do you do when an item is faulty? Do you take it back? Do you get fobbed off? Do you still use it?

It is National Consumer Week and a survey from Citizens Advice found 66% of people have had an issue with a faulty electrical item such as a TV, a mobile phone or a household appliance in the last two years.  Just over half of people surveyed (53%) asked the retailer to provide a refund, replace the item or repair the product. But around one in four (28%) said the retailer turned them away, either redirecting them to the manufacturer or refusing to help.  Only 61% of those who were initially turned away eventually got some form of redress after being persistent.

Emma Drackford, Head of Communications at Electrical Safety First, highlights the dangers of not returning faulty products. “We know that many people continue to use an electrical item, even when they are aware that it could be faulty or dangerous. Our research shows that only 10% to 20% people respond to a recall, despite the huge risks of electrical shock, fire or even death that faulty electrical items can present.  We have seen cases of faulty products such as fake Nutribullets which have caught fire after several weeks or even months of use. If you’re aware that your product is fake, substandard or has been recalled we urge you to stop using it immediately and report the fault to the manufacturer or retailer. Seven in eight accidental fires of electrical origin are caused by products; continuing to use a faulty electrical product is simply too big a risk to take.”

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Elizabeth Doyle-Davies plugged in her Amazon Kindle Fire charger overnight. It caught fire, causing huge damage to her home and meaning that the family to evacuate the house. This shows what can happen when using faulty electrical items.”

 

fire damage caused by faulty goods

Helen Dewdney – The Complaining Cow consumer blogger, campaigner and author of How to Complain The Essential Consumer Guide to Getting Refunds, Redress and Results! is not surprised by the statistics. She hears many of the fob offs that retailers give consumers, “Take it back to the manufacturer” or “We will only replace the product” are extremely common. “Unless consumers are fully aware of their legal rights and assert them too many will get fobbed off by poor policy and untrained staff.”

So, what should you do if you have bought one of those faulty electrical items? “First and foremost know your rights” she says!

  • Under the Consumer Rights Act those electrical items, should be as described, match the description, be of satisfactory quality and last a reasonable length of time. So if the item is in breach of any of these then up to 30 days you are entitled to a full refund. After this time you may have to accept a repair or replacement.
  • Give a gift receipt. Your rights transfer to the recipient but remember the 30 day rule, so you may want to try the item first.
  • Do not be fobbed off by “Take it to the manufacturer”. Your contract is always with the retailer who sold you the product.
  • If you do not get a satisfactory response to your complaint try emailing the CEO about the issue. You can find their contact details on the ceoemail.com website.
  • If you are still not happy with the reply, ask for a letter of deadlock or if after 8 weeks from the initial complaint, take it to the relevant Ombudsman. Many of the retailers selling electrical items are members of The Furniture Ombdusman so when purchasing items you can also look to see if the retailer is a member before you buy.
  • You have the same consumer rights whether you buy in a shop or online. If a retailer says you have to pay return postage this is not correct! You may have to pay if you just change your mind (under the Consumer Contract Regulations 2013 – you can send items back for a full refund up to 14 days after receiving them).