How to spot and avoid a fake electrical purchase

1-electrical-safety-first-primaryRecently an investigation from Electrical Safety First revealed that one in six consumers had bought a fake electrical product as a Christmas gift in the past. The Charity found that the majority of people couldn’t tell a genuine from a fake electrical product. Electrical Safety First is a UK Charity dedicated to reducing and preventing damage, injuries and death caused by electricity. More information can be found on their website. http://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk

Buying a fake isn’t just a scam, fake electrical items have been known to explode and catch fire. If you’ve bought the goods through social media or an online marketplace, it can be much more difficult to trace the seller. Before you take advantage of Black Friday, Cyber Monday, or any other kind of sales deals, I asked Emma Drackford, Head of Communications at Electrical Safety First to share some advice  on the best ways to spot and avoid buying a fake. #switchedon National Consumer Week.

How to avoid buying fake electrical goods?
Our top tip on how to avoid buying a fake is to purchase electrical products directly from reputable retailers, this way you can be assured you’re buying the real thing.  Some fake products can be almost impossible to identify as they have sophisticated packaging and design. However, internally they are usually missing vital safety components meaning the products could be at risk of exploding.

The most common ways to come across fakes:
According to our consumer research, most people who have purchased fakes have done so on online marketplaces (such as Amazon, eBay, etc.), but there is a growing trend of buying fakes on social media.

If you’re shopping for a bargain online, keep your eyes peeled for any of the following signs.

How to spot fake electrical products online:

  • If a bargain looks too good to be true, it probably is! Check prices and shop around, if possible visit the high street.
  • Beware of a product with solely glowing reviews, especially if the reviewers aren’t verified. Some sites cross-reference user reviews with their buyer database and label those people as “verified purchasers”.
  • If there is no address supplied, or there is just a PO Box, be wary; many fake electrical goods are manufactured overseas, where they will not be safety tested and are produced as quickly and cheaply as possible. A ‘co.uk’ URL doesn’t guarantee the website is UK-based.
  • Beware of words like ‘genuine’ ‘real’ or ‘authentic.’ Most reputable retailers don’t need to use these descriptions to sell their products.
  • If you can’t see a padlock symbol on the bottom of the screen, do not enter your payment details. Look for websites that allow you to pay safely.

How to spot if you’ve bought a fake item

  • Inspect the packaging and item carefully. Look out for the tell-tale signs of flimsy packaging and substandard printing, such as spelling mistakes or grammatical errors. Compare your item to an online image from a trusted, high street retailer.
  • Look for a legitimate safety certification label. All electrical products will have one or more safety certifications on their label if made by a legitimate manufacturer. If the certification mark is present only on the packaging, but not on the product itself, there’s a good chance the product is fake.
  • Make sure everything that should be there is there. Fake products may not include supplementary materials such as a manual or a product registration card or even all the parts!
  • Check the plug. If you’ve purchased your product from a UK retailer, look to see whether the appliance has a three-pin UK plug or charger.
  • Trust your instinct. If you are still uncertain about your product for any reason, you’re probably right to be wary. Visit the high street to compare your product to those on sale in store; if your item varies in any way do not use it.

What to do if you think you might have purchased a fake electrical product:
If you suspect you have purchased a fake, stop using it immediately. Report it to Trading Standards so that they can take action against the seller; selling fake products is illegal and puts people’s lives at risk. For advice on how to be refunded and for more advice on how to spot a fake, visit Spot the fake.

Not fake but still faulty?
See Consumer Rights Act 2015 and Top Tips on How to Complain and for much more information, advice, guidance, tips and templates on complaining effectively get the book. How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

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