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Reverse advent calendar campaign

How you can join in the FoodbankAdvent campaign


This post was updated for 2018

I intend to participate for 2019

FoodbankAdvent background

Many of us love the Xmas advent calendar, especially those with children who get a chocolate each day don’t we? (And just where did those advent calendars go that just had the picture??) But many families are sleeping in bed and breakfast (that’s a just a term by the way, there is no breakfast).  The breadwinner has simply lost their job or fallen sick  and/or most have fallen foul of the failure known as the benefits system and the chaos that Iain Duncan Smith started. And let’s not forget he resided over it for some time before completely messing up the Universal Credit system for someone else to take the blame! But hey that’s just my opinion! Many of these families are local to YOU and their children go to YOUR children’s school. That is if you don’t already have use of it yourself as the numbers of users are growing out of control.

It is just so wrong that whilst many of us over indulge this Christmas, so many people will be struggling to feed their kids at all and/or will go hungry themselves through no fault of their own. With no school meals over the holidays and the need to heat homes, the struggle is even worse at this time than any other.  The use of foodbanks rises by 45% in December. The reverse advent calendar is just one small way in which you can give something back and it’s helping your local community too.

What is the Reverse Advent Calendar?

This reverse advent calendar is a great idea. It’s been happening for a few years now all over the world. The UK Money bloggers have launched a campaign to really give it a push again this year and as one of the bloggers I am helping to promote it.

Each day for 24 days you put something for the food bank in a box and at the end of this time give it to your local foodbank. Some sites start on the 1st December and hand it in on the 24th December. But please see Tips and ideas below as most of us are doing it through November. We are doing 30 days again too so it’s all up to you!

Statistics on the use of foodbanks

The Trussell Trust’s Foodbank network of over 425 foodbanks handed out 1,182,954 three-day emergency food supplies given to people in crisis in the year April 2016 – March 2017. But remember there are many more foodbanks all over the country which are not part of this network so the numbers are far bigger that need to use these services.

Trussell Trust’s foodbank network provided 1,332,952 three day food supplies between 1st April 2017 and 31st March 2018, a 13% increase from the previous year and issues with benefits continue to be the most common cause of referral.

Early Warnings: Universal Credit and Foodbanks, highlights that although the rollout of the new Universal Credit system for administering benefits has been piecemeal so far, foodbanks in areas of partial or full rollout are reporting significant problems with its impact.

Key findings of foodbank use

The Trussell Trust commissioned an 18-month research project from the University of Oxford, led by Dr Rachel Loopstra where the key findings were:

• Households using food banks face extreme financial vulnerability. All food bank users had, in the last month, an income well below the threshold for low income. More than 1/3 of households experienced an income shock in the past three months and over 2/3 reported unexpected and rising expenses during the same period.
• Almost half of households reported their incomes were unsteady from week to week or month to month.
• Half of households included someone with a disability.
• Lone parents and their children constitute the largest number of people receiving help from food banks, though single male households are the most common household type.
• Over 78% of households were severely food insecure. For a majority of households, this was a chronic experience, happening every month or almost every month over the past 12 months.
• Food bank users experience multiple forms of destitution – 50% had gone without heating for more than four days in the past 12 months, and 1 in 5 had slept rough in the last 12 months.

28 Reverse advent calendar tips and ideas

  1. Think about when you want to do this. Doing it through December may seem like a good idea but if you are going to put some Xmas related food things in there, it may be too late for the food bank to donate. Find out from your local one when would be best to donate, it may want a mix as donations may be fewer in January. Trussell Trust has said to us specifically that they would like donations earlier in December.
  2. Google foodbank and your local area, not all foodbanks are run by Trussell, many are by other charities and churches.
  3. Contact your local foodbank and see if there are items of which they particularly short, and when would be best for you to drop off the box.  Although they will be grateful for anything 20 cartons of UHT milk maybe something they are short of possibly more useful than 20 different tins of beans and soup.
  4. Remember that some foodbanks also welcome toiletries so that families can maintain dignity and this will last them longer than the 3 days of food that they get too.
  5. Obviously foodbanks need non perishables, but look for long term sell by dates too to make it easier for foodbanks to manage. It could be that your foodbank gets masses for Xmas and then has nothing except going out of date food in the Spring or nothing at all! Ask what is best for them.
  6. Get the children involved, decorating the box, ideas of what to put in and perhaps even donate some pocket money or sweets?
  7. Drawer full of toiletries gift sets? Donate them
  8. Share the idea on social media with #FoodbankAdvent to spread the word
  9. Pastas, dried fruit, tins of soup, vegetables, rice pudding, custard etc., packets and jars of sauces, biscuits, tea/coffee, UHT milk, long life juices, baby food, rice, cereals, noodles, health bars, lentils, cakes, mince pies, Xmas puddings, bread/similar which keeps longer than fresh, such as part baked bread, waffles, wraps etc., crisps and other savoury items, soap, deodorant, shower gel, toothpaste, toothbrushes, sanitary products, toilet rolls, baby wipes and shampoo. Think of things that don’t need to be heated too, such as cold meats and fish so a substantial meal can still be had and boxes of Smash that only need water to make.
  10. Carrier bags! Or conference totes/canvas bags for life instead for more eco friendly use!
  11. If you want to support pregnant women and families with infants see the First Steps Nutrition advice. (Note, Foodbanks usually won’t take formula.)
  12. Remember users of foodbanks are struggling to feed their families, as well as the essentials, so think about putting some treats in such as chocolates too (think of buying when buy one get one free on those tubs for even more!)
  13. Get the bargains when you see them in the supermarket and bargain shops which will good for toiletries. When you get the buy one get one frees consider giving them both that day!
  14. Keep an eye out for coupons and discount codes for items that you wouldn’t use yourself but would make ideal items for the foodbank
  15. Don’t forget to look in your cupboards for food you bought or were given but are now unlikely to use
  16. If you are going to get things with shorter life span such as part bake bread get them nearer the end of the 24 days!
  17. It was on one of those food programmes about saving money a few weeks ago showing that if you go down the World Food aisle that you will often find similar products just with a different name to that you are used to but are actually cheaper
  18. You don’t need a fancy box! Anything will do, everything gets sorted when it arrives at the foodbank and you don’t have to think what goes with what, the volunteers will sort into bags for users for you.
  19. Consider throwing in some sachets of herbs, remember that a lot of those emergency food bags will be full of bulky plain food, herbs and spices will add some flavour and take up little room in that bag
  20. Foodbanks are run by volunteers, consider volunteering or donating long term
  21. Think about getting your workplace colleagues to run some boxes, make it competitive between teams if you work in a big workplace! Or use it as way to spread the cost, you could also do this with your neighbours and your children’s clubs and groups
  22. Great Tip! Shopmium and Checkoutsmart Now, here’s a great little app. If you go to Shopmium* you can get food with discounts or even for free. That’s a referral link, so if you go through and sign up on that I’ll get a freebie, you get a freebie and you will see the offers on at the moment which change all the time. Then you will have your own referral code too. I am using the offers to get discounts on perishables plus perishables that I don’t like so that the foodbank can get extra too taking advantage of every bargain I can get to be able to give more. Wins all round! All you need to do is take a photo of the bar code and receipt and you get your cash back. Shopimum uses all the major supermarkets. Checkoutsmart no referral codes but works same way. Seems to have more looking through at the moment.
  23. When you are out shopping, tell the assistants what you are doing, you may inspire other people to join in.
  24. Check with your foodbank how and when is best for dropping of your boxes.
  25. Healthy is good, but some people have just a kettle so pot noodles are fine too.
  26. Check if you have a babybank near you. Google babybank and your area. You may have seen Dispatches on babybanks? Expectant and new parents who have nothing for their newborns at what should be a double exciting time. Consider donating baby items, contact the banks to see what they need.
  27. There won’t be fresh meat or fish to put jars/packets of sauce on, so think about tinned meat and fish and also packets of soya.
  28. See if your foodbank also takes food for pets. Someone could have a pet and was looking after it quite well until the transfer to UC saw that they went without money for 5 weeks so now they can’t feed their pet either.

From I, Daniel Blake:

Iain Duncan Smith and politics

Can’t really do a post about foodbanks without mentioning this really.

Those of you who have been following my blog for some time will know that I interviewed Iain Duncan Smith when he was Director of Death and Destruction because he is my MP (don’t blame me I didn’t vote for him). The Complaining Cow Meets Iain Duncan Smith #IDSfail and Round 2 The Complaining Cow Meets IDS   when I went a second time much to his displeasure. I used the fact that I could go to his surgeries and took him to task in the limited time I had. One of the things, amongst many, was foodbanks.

The Complaining Cow and Iain Duncan Smith discuss Food Banks

I did let the food bank know of his request but I don’t think they wanted him there! One can understand why not.

And whilst we are about it. Jacob Rees-Mogg is one of the wealthiest MPs in Parliament. He has reportedly made millions of pounds in high finance and is due to inherit £100 million from his family estate. Know what he said about foodbanks? “The rise of food banks across the UK is actually “rather uplifting” because it shows the British people are charitable” and “The real reason for the rise in numbers is because people know they are there and Labour refused to tell them.” Idiocy for a supposedly educated man. One of those academics with no common sense. Or empathy. Or compassion. Or understanding of issues facing millions of families in the UK.

So who is first against the wall come the revolution do you think? Duncan Smith? Rees-Mogg? May? Farage? Gove? It’s ok I think there will be enough of us to take them all.

Since when did feeding UK children boil down to volunteers?

Foodbank volunteers donate at least £30million a year in unpaid work Foodbank volunteers ‘perform £30million a year worth of unpaid work’, shock study reveals Volunteers do a staggering 2,909,196 hours of unpaid work distributing food – and calculating the value of their time using the minimum wage, currently £7.50 an hour for the over 25s, it equates to £21,818,967 a year; or 55,945 hours, with a value of £419,587 each week. Should feeding children with no food or heating really be down to volunteers and donations?

Universal Credit and the impact on foodbank usage

The Trussell Trust report  The next stage of Universal Credit states that: “When Universal Credit goes live in an area, there is a demonstrable increase in demand in local Trussell Trust foodbanks. On average, 12 months after rollout, foodbanks see a 52% increase in demand, compared to 13% in areas with Universal Credit for 3 months or less. This increase cannot be attributed to randomness and exists even after accounting for seasonal and other variations.

More detailed foodbank referral data show that benefit transitions, most likely due to people moving onto Universal Credit, are increasingly accounting for more referrals and are likely driving up need in areas of full Universal Credit rollout. Waiting for the first payment is a key cause, while for many, simply the act of moving over to a new system is causing hardship.

This poses serious questions for the next stage of Universal Credit, where many people could lose their benefits entirely or find themselves with less income. The Department’s current plans involve sending letters to people informing them their claim will be terminated if they do not apply for Universal Credit within a four week period. Each claimant will then have to wait at least five weeks for their first payment. Some of the most vulnerable people in our country will be moved onto Universal Credit under this next stage, with half claiming tax credits and a third claiming disability benefits.
The Department plans to offer support for vulnerable claimants, but has not set out how they will identify vulnerability or what support will be offered. ‘Transitional protection’, where no claimant should receive less under Universal Credit than legacy benefits, can be lost if claims are incorrect or if minor circumstances change.”

Quick word on donating Advent calendars

It may cross your mind to donate some chocolate advent calendars. However, for those of us who have them, it leads up to the big day. Most families, if not all using a foodbank, will be using food possibly not even heated for Christmas day. Just another day, no big build up.

Also some get inundated and for others they arrive too late.

I am going to donate a load of selection boxes again  this year with the calendar box instead:

selection boxes

Rounding up on the reverse foodbankadvent

So, are you going to do your box with me? I’m starting on the 1st November again. My supermarket delivery comes tomorrow so I’ve just added some items to it! Share on social media using the #foodbankadvent hashtag to encourage others. If you have any more tips, or ideas to share please do add them in the comments and please share the word wherever you can, it is such a good idea and helps so many people who really are in a desperate situation.

I’ll leave the last word to Lisi, daughter of Becky Goddard-Hill who blogs at Babybudgeting. So get your kids involved too. My son  decorated (ish!) the box but wouldn’t do anything on camera so well done Lisi!

The contents of my foodbank boxes Christmas 2017 and 2018

Day 10 2017

A third of the way in. The more eagle eyed will note that there are more than 10 items in here! That’s because so far I have got 3 jars of baby food, some chick pea puffs and some baked pea snacks for free so they are bonus items!

They came from 3 different shops using Shopmiumand Checkoutsmart.

Day 15 2017

Half way in (we are doing 30 days)day 15 items for the foodbank, baby food, biscuits, broth, chocolates, tuna, mackrel, toothpaste etc

Day 20 2018

 

Day 22 2017

Two thirds (and a day!) in

Day 22 foodbank box, cereal, crisps, biscuits, rice, tins etc

Day 30 2017

Finished and ready to donate
2 boxes full of stuff for foodbank

 

Day 30 2018

Tins pasta biscuits deodorant baby foodAnd I didn’t eat them:

10 chocolate advent calendars

Ready to deliver!

 

Vlogmas With The Drews Day 6 | How much can £10 buy for a food bank? | Emma Drew

 

A sad reflection on society when you also have The Advent of Folly

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Categories
Financial issues Holidays and transport Latest News ways to save money

How to save money on your car insurance

Hacks for saving money on your car insurance

Rules making insurance prices clearer for consumers

In April 2018 new rules came into force for insurers. These rules mean that insurers must provide the cost of the previous year as well as the renewal. This way it is clearer for consumers to see just how big the hike is.

The Association of British Insurers (ABI) and the British Insurance Brokers’ Association (BIBA) have published new Guiding Principles and Action Points for members to ensure customers who don’t switch every year are offered a fairer deal. However, does this go far enough?

Vunerable customers and insurance

Vulnerable customers in particular are still likely to be hit. Those who don’t have Internet access, those who don’t know they can switch etc. Will they continue to accept the hike? More needs to be done to educate consumers that they can switch. And more needs to be done to make insurers reward loyalty. As I’ve said many times about other sectors, telecoms in particular, it needs a company to take a risk for a couple of years. Say it will invest in customer service, training and take a hit by not hiking prices and gain the loyalty and spread the message through word of mouth (and social media etc!)

The ABI and BIBA has said it wants members to provide all the information about switching in their correspondence but will it happen? They need to do more to encourage companies to do right by their customers.

Don’t auto renew your insurance

steering wheel and dashboard

Most people still aren’t aware that they should not just let their car insurance renew. Just like house and buildings every year, it is rare that your renewal will be cheaper than starting afresh. I have just taken out my car insurance, and, (after recovering from the jaw drop of seeing how much my car has gone down in value!) thought I’d give you some figures just to show you the importance of shopping around and not just using comparison websites. These are all quotes from today 11th October 2017.

1st Central renewal quote £505.00
1st Central renewal online chat £490.00 (when stopping auto renewal online chat)
1st Central direct on website £473.95
Moneysupermarket.com (1st Central cheapest) £503.31
Confused.com (AA cheapest) £393.91
Comparethemeerkat (MoreThan cheapest) £385.12
MoreThan direct on website £382.28
AA direct on website £348.31
AA through Topcashback £348.31 (minus £40 paid to Topcashback account)

A saving of £196.69 (39%) of the renewal price. It is such a boring way to spend half an hour of your life, it really is! But! How can you not do it when it saves this sort of money?

Update 28/05/21 FCA stops insurance companies’ loyalty penalty Insurance companies will no longer be allowed to auto renew at a higher cost than it would be for a new customer. However, see the article you can still get cheaper!

Cashback on insurance

Topcashback* is a great cashback site. Go there before buying anything. Sign up and whenever you shop check Topcashback first. If the store is listed click on the link and get cashback. Don’t rely on this though as there may be terms and conditions that you miss (such as using vouchers) negating the cashback. Other big cashback sites include Kidstart* (where the cashback goes to your nominated child’s bank account), Quidco* and Free fivers*. Others that I’ve not used are  Imutual, Give or take and there are others. It is worth signing up to a few as they all have different traders,  % cashback and offers on at various times. Time consuming but worth it more often than not! £40 for taking an extra five minutes is quite a nice hourly rate (if only I could do it all hours!)

17 top tips for saving money on motor insurance

  • Last year, using a cashback site wasn’t cheaper, somehow in the system it knew! So don’t think that after getting your cheapest quote you always get the cashback from the same price. Clear your cookies which may help!
  • Don’t completely disregard your renewal quote as most companies are nearly always open to haggling. I’ve yet to hear of anyone failing when they do this.
  • I only went direct to the cheapest offer on each of the comparison websites
  • Some providers are only able to produce a certain number of quotations per customer, and after the limit has been reached, they will no longer be able to produce quotations online on some sites so don’t make hundreds of tweaks!
  • Bizarre as it may sound, it can be cheaper to add someone to your policy. Particularly useful for a first year or a young driver, if they add a more experienced driver it can bring the average down whilst helping the main driver build up no claims.
  • You can always try changing your job title. I’ve heard of people getting cheaper quotes when changing “builder” to “construction” etc., but to be perfectly honest I’ve never seen a difference and of course it does still have to describe the job! But it may work with some insurers so do try it.
  • Save your details on the comparison websites so if you keep the car you don’t have to waste your time filling it all out again.
  • When researching for insurance for learner drivers get an idea fir how much it will go up when they pass their test!
  • It is possible to get a discount for multi car cover, even when renewals are at different dates. But really watch out for the renewal quotes! Some may give a discount for a second car.
  • Make sure you are on the electoral roll. Some companies use it to check for ID purposes to reduce fraud, if they can’t find you they may not give a quote
  • Look at deals that may work out cheaper if you switch your contents and building insurance  same provider and visa versa.
  • Check the additional add ons. Do you already have breakdown cover, is something already covered by your bank, travel or house insurance? And can you get them cheaper elsewhere. I use Tesco clubcard points for RAC cover for example.
  • Pay up front rather than in instalments if you can as this is always cheaper.
  • Adding a more experienced driver to your policy can reduce the premium.
  • Check the excess, think about how much you could afford to pay and go with that, the difference between £50 and £100 excess can reduce the amount significantly.
  • Don’t leave until the last minute, compare prices about 3 weeks before the renewal date and make sure you cancel any auto renewal! The price increases the nearer to the renewal date.
  • Third party isn’t always the cheapest, so check fully comprehensive too. Some insurers will assess you as a safer driver for doing so.

Bonus tips for saving money on your car insurance!

After doing the quote and post I asked some fellow money bloggers for tips that I hadn’t thought of and now I wonder if I could have got it reduced even further!

Katy from KatyKicker  wrote about saving money on insurance and provides lots of tips, one being a really really good point! Check the policy! When you go through comparison websites check like for like, windscreen cover, legal cover, replacement car etc. And consider asking your current provider for a loyalty discount rather than just quoting competitors’ prices.

I never go for all the legal cover. But Emma from TheMoneyWhisperer has written about how to get free legal protection from Freemotorlegal and I’ve just signed up! Then Lee from Freemotorlegal wrote a guest post Why Motor Legal Protection is a rip off and the free alternative

Emily from A Thrify Fox says she had an automated email thingy from confused.com telling her that Admiral was the cheapest for her.

Now this is a little known secret and is brilliant! Emma from Mumssavvysavings wrote a post about Reducing the cost of learning to drive. In it she says that she got insurance from a company  that they pay for 28 days of insurance and it is only used on any days they choose within three months. Superb!

Further links and resources

Do Morethan just comparison websites for insurance quotes! A couple of years ago I picked up on the differences in prices between a standard quote and a quote going through a cashback site…. I complained, obviously. No laws broken but still got the refund of the difference 🙂 Also just double check the quotes. Sometimes the cheapest quote is for 10 months!

If you need help with a complaint re insurance or anything else see Top 20 Tips How to Complain!

Cover of How to Complain updated 2019 large cow logo

 

For much more advice, guidance, templates, consumer laws and information GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

 

 

 

 

Switching insurance

The importance of switching energy suppliers and telecom providers on ITV News

Loyalty penalty to stop announced 28/01/21

FCA announces remedies to stop the loyalty penalty

 

 

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