Can’t find a company email address? Here’s how to get it!

Customer service: Email still beats webchat and phone calls

Many companies make it difficult for customers to complain.

I have always advocated writing to companies when complaining, for several reasons.

1) So that you have the evidence trail should you need to take the matter further

2) You can ensure that you have covered everything you need to do and

3) You can delete and rewrite if you are getting angry while drafting, which you can’t do on the phone!

Yesterday (1 July 2020) BBC Watchdog aired their investigation into companies which made it difficult for customers to contact them. It showed people not able to get through on webchat or being cut off on phone calls. It also showed how some companies refused to provide an email address for customer service. More businesses are doing this as people learn that to complain effectively and to go to an ombudsman – or go to court – they will need that written evidence to prove the case.

The programme covered Currys, Ikea, Three, Sainsbury’s. One viewer said he was 167th in the queue on a webchat and waited over an hour when it all disappeared and he had to start again. One caller was waiting for 5 hours and another for 7 hours trying to reach someone at Currys.

Sainsburys does not currently have a customer service email address. I discovered this back in February and when I asked them why this was, a spokesperson said “We regularly review our services and made these changes long before our priority delivery slots launched. Customers can continue to contact us via phone, Twitter and Facebook.”

Companies may be removing email addresses as a cost-cutting exercise, or deliberately, in order to make it more difficult for customers to complain. The more difficult it is to complain, the less likely people are to do it.email icon

How to email when companies don’t want you to!

However, it IS possible to email companies quite easily. The website Ceoemail.com provides the email addresses for the CEOs of companies free of charge. When emailing the CEO it is unlikely that the CEO will personally respond (although a few do) but it does get a response from the CEO’s executive team and you will have a written record of your complaint.

So for example, the companies named on BBC Watchdog as ones where you could not easily contact them by email….. here you go…so now you can…

Currys

Ikea

Three

Sainsburys

What about social media?

You can also use social media but do be aware that it has its limitations. People frequently say that they have successfully complained because they have used social media. Occasionally if used in the right way, your complaint is simple, the trader has a good social media team and the wind is in the right direction it may be possible to get a good result.

Used in the right way social media can be a good tool to name and shame and speed things up but that’s the limit., In the end you will still need to provide all the details off the public forum, which is as good as sending an email in the first place. See 5 ways how not to use Twitter to complain (and 5 ways how you should) to get the best from complaining using Twitter.

Successful companies are easily contactable and accountable

It is very shortsighted of companies to behave in this manner. In general people don’t mind when companies make mistakes, it’s how they deal with them that matters. If they make it difficult for customers to complain then those customers will tell others, the company’s reputation  and stop using the company..

But don’t be beaten!

Further help

See Top 20 Tips How to Complain! for how to write an effective email.

Cover of How to Complain updated 2019 large cow logo

 

For masses of information, tips, guidance, laws and regulations and templates GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

6 ways the CEO screws up!

When the CEO receives a complaint (and it is so easy to find a CEO’s email address now see ceoemail.com) it is often the CEO’s fault. Here’s why…

1)  Complaints about call centres  there are so many complaints about waiting times, being passed over etc. Many issues and reasons for the complaints are discussed in this post Call Centres. Most if not all boil down to the CEO. Who is putting the time limits on calls, making decisions about targets etc?

2) Rude staff – who is responsible for recruiting the people who recruited the rude staff? Who is responsible for ensuring that there are robust recruitment and disciplinary systems in place and who is responsible for recruiting that person? You keep going up until you reach the CEO. His/her fault!

3) Staff who don’t know where products are or how to carry out a service? Training is needed and again, who is responsible for that, one keeps going up until you reach the CEO!

4) Staff morale is low and they in turn provide poor service. Who is responsible for pay and conditions? Ultimately the CEO!

5) Staff don’t go the extra mile for a customer, they do the bare minimum. Who is responsible for putting in measures that make staff loyal to the company? That’ll be the CEO.

6) Sales go down because the CEO doesn’t care for his or her customers, just profits and this shines through all the way down through the ranks to the face to face staff because the brown mucky stuff starts from the top. Look at my posts about the previous Tesco CEO

If CEOs cared about what their customers wanted and listened to them they’d do what they want and the profits would follow. Just. Simple. Common. Sense. Not rocket science, common sense. So many a CEO got all the qualifications but sadly there is no qualification in common sense. Every company makes mistakes it is how they deal with the mistake that matters. That is down to the CEO too. Empower staff to make decisions, train them to make the right ones and the complaint won’t be escalated to the CEO. Simples. So many CEOs don’t see it.

Marcus Williamson, the editor of www.ceoemail.com wrote a guest post on How to contact CEOs and more information on email the CEO!

Top 20 Tips on complaining effectively

Top 20 Tips for Complaining Effectively