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10 Top tips for avoiding complaints and managing them

The Complaining Cow’s Ten Top Tips for the Complained Against!

Search well and you can find lots of help in improving your customer service and experience, sales etc. But perhaps it’s time you looked at what a seasoned complainer gets most annoyed about, the annoyances you don’t know about and the people you don’t reach when gaining feedback and then what you can do about it?! Perhaps a customer is best placed to advise you on how to improve the customer experience and show who you are missing when you gain feedback and how you can improve your sales.

1) Dealing with customers on the telephone

If someone rings to complain then they may well be irate and/or rude. I advise people never to ‘phone, only to write, unless absolutely necessary. This is because it is easy to get really angry, forget your points and be rude. You have the right not to deal with someone if they are being rude. I say this as an experienced complainer. Try to calm the caller down but be assertive. Recognise that they have a problem they wish to discuss but state that you will only listen if they please calm down so that you can help. You cannot help until the emotion has been dealt with. Staff should always be polite and apologise where necessary. You win people round that way. But it must be genuine, we can all tell when it’s just being said to shut us up!

2) Empower your staff

Nothing frustrates the complainer more than having to repeat their complaint. Train your staff well. Ensure that they are equipped with the right knowledge and tools to deal with complaints both at face to face contact with customers and in the Customer Service department.

If your staff are working face to face train them to gauge when someone wants to talk and when they don’t. Absolute pet hate of many customers! Think about which staff will use their initiative and when they should be encouraged to do so. Also what they will do with “Rules”.

Where are your customer service skills? How do you improve them?

 

“Have a nice Day” NO thank you

So often my complaints have been about staff not knowing the answer or giving misinformation. Obviously at times you will have new staff! Make sure that there are always more knowledgeable people easily to hand. This is a common problem!

The best quality you can ever look for when recruiting is common sense! Everything else comes from good training and looking after your staff well. Looked after staff look after customers.

3) Always ask for clarity/more information so that it is easier to resolve the problem

Having written countless complaints for lots of people where they have previously failed to gain redress, I have seen time and time again that people have not given enough information – it’s badly written or things just aren’t clear. Don’t deal with a complaint as quickly as possible. Go back and ask for more information and/or clarity if necessary. It could well be that there is some really useful feedback for you if you are open and prepared to find out more.

Often companies try and deal with the initial complaint and make more problems for themselves because they have assumed something incorrectly. If in doubt, ask a colleague then ask the customer, never ever assume. You’ll see examples of how this piece of advice should have been followed in some of my more protracted complaints!

4) Social media

Twitter and other Social media streams may be good to communicate with customers but give the staff the tools to be able to do the job properly. Good training and good management support with efficient and effective systems and processes to follow and test them. I’ve used Twitter to try and resolve a complaint and the staff tweeting didn’t investigate properly and made the matter worse.

Remember the power of social media. Even ignoring one tweet can lose you business.

Why CEOs should have a presence on social media

5) Improve your internal and external communication

You’ll see throughout my consumer blog posts, that one big common factor when making the biggest and/or longest complaints is the poor communication between departments. So often, once the CEO’s office has been contacted it is found that one department didn’t pass on a piece of information to another. Set up adequate systems and test them appropriately.

Identify, explore and reduce the risks associated with your correspondence with vulnerable customers

Calling all CEOs: please read emails from your customers and learn about your own business

6) Set up meaningful log systems

Log your letters, phone calls and emails regarding complaints. Ensure adequate records and systems are kept of categories of complaints so that you can monitor and improve on all areas including those you didn’t know about! Keep records of which ones you have had to pay out the most/frequency/amount. Keep records of how the complaint came in, whether it was escalated with sections for why etc. as this in itself gives rise to another complaint. You will be able to see what types of complaints are fewest but costing you the most and the complaints which are the most frequent so that you can address appropriately. Ensure your system is filled out with every complaint that comes in. Set up regular predetermined dates to address each category and revisit for patterns/changes. Obviously you will need to keep records of what has been done to address issues to date. You will need to have very large systems if you have several stores of course!

7) Feedback tools warnings

Don’t use gimmicks for gaining feedback. Utterly pointless. One store I sometimes shop in has put in one of those interactive screens where you tap on the answer. Some people will just keep pressing a negative button skewing your figures and children just press it to get the sounds. It’s also insulting to your customers. You can’t possibly use that feedback and we know it.

You can use Mystery Shoppers but be aware of the many limitations. The Complaining Cow is a Mystery Shopper! I registered with many years ago but I did very little, mainly because the pay is poor and I was only doing it for a bit of fun and pocket money! But I can tell you that very few test their shoppers before they go out on assignments and anyone can apply with any standard of education. I’m sure Mystery Shopping companies will tell you that anyone can apply but not everyone is accepted! This may be true but the rates for jobs do not equate to anything near even a low level manager’s salary so you’ll see my point. Also, what’s the point of sending someone to buy a pot of margarine and take it back? It’s not real. Use a real scenario, the real family shop. What’s the point of asking a Mystery Shopper to undertake a flight when what you really want to see is what a family who really fly with you thinks? It’s the same with meals and take-aways. The differences in experience are vast. There are numerous ways of doing this!  See The Complaining Cow Confidential, Tailored Mystery Shops.

When you are using feedback forms, complaint letters/phone calls/emails you are actually only reaching a limited type of customer. Think about it. People who are prone to wanting to give their opinions are like me! How are you are going to reach the people who aren’t assertive, don’t give their opinions willingly etc? These people’s views are just as important and, dare I say it, possibly more important than mine! That’s because these are the people who will not use your store again and will not tell you why. You don’t know what you don’t know! A friend of mine often tells me to hold back if I don’t like something in a shop. She is non confrontational and too lazy or doesn’t have the time to write a letter of complaint or write with suggestions on any feedback forms! However, she does walk out of shops, they DO lose her custom but they don’t know who they lost or why. For example, Marks and Spencer haven’t been doing too well lately. One of the things they may have done to address this is pack more clothes in. Perhaps an “Expert” told them that they needed to put more “stuff” in the stores to sell more. No-one asked the customers though did they? My friend who used to regularly spend hundreds of pounds in M & S now hates shopping there. Why? You used to be able to see through and over rails and move about easily. Now, it’s common to barge into people looking at the next rail and you can’t see where you need to go if in a rush. Twice we have left early because the place annoyed us and the last time we heard a mother say to her daughter “Let’s get out of this place it’s too crowded.” So, they lost 3 customers in as many minutes. Do you think the powers that be in Marks and Spencer know?

Remember, if you ask a customer if their expectations were exceeded and they say “yes” that they might have had a really bad experience before so anything is better! Choose your questions carefully to get you the information need not the information you want to hear.

8) Gain feedback creatively

Look for creative ways of getting feedback, even risky ways. Just because you use feedback forms, Twitter, Facebook and direct feedback through complaints etc. doesn’t mean that you are getting the most useful or best information. Yes use tried and tested methods but if you want to gain over your competitors why not do something different? Try inviting a group of people who have recently complained about your service to tell you what they think of your store/service/organisation! This will be risky, you are going to meet/deal with people who used up your time and annoyed you and you may get given a mile long list but these are the people who complain, these are the people who have no problem telling you how you could improve, these are the voices of the people who use you. Surely you need to hear them? Ask someone from outside your organisation to facilitate the session to ensure that you really get the information you need.

Guide customers with humour!

I haven’t seen children and young people mentioned on any customer service website or advice website! Are you a family friendly organisation? Ask the children and young people! They generally don’t write letters of complaint (although mine is encouraged to and he’s only 4years old!) they don’t tend to fill out feedback forms and younger ones aren’t using Social Media. But again, their views are important, they are aiding their parents/carers in deciding where to shop etc. Is that another untapped resource that you have been ignoring in gaining your feedback? How are you going to get their views? Creatively! (Not using your existing staff because different skills are needed. You wouldn’t ask your customer care team to undertake youth or playwork would you?!) How you do this needs to be planned carefully and appropriately, with due care and attention to legal issues, experience and knowledge of the people undertaking this work for you.

Know Your Customer

9) Reward customers for their feedback

Reward your customers for their feedback. You are doing that when you send goodwill gestures to those who complain to you. (So you should, as they have taken the time and trouble to bring the matter to your attention and if you use the feedback well it will save you far more in the long run). You pay your senior managers a high wage and you may even pay for consultants but the best people to tell you how you can improve are your customers so reward them for telling you and they will remain loyal.

Remember the general adage “Happy customers tell 3 of their friends, unhappy ones tell 10”. However, with the development of Review sites, Internet Forums and Social Media the figures are now much bigger!!! How far you go in making amends can make a huge difference. If you remain unconvinced read my Blog! How many people am I telling about service?!

10) Thank your customers!

Always respond to customers. Thank them for their feedback. It doesn’t matter how big or small your organisation, that customer, however frustrating/persistent s/he may have been, could have given you the best piece of information to improve your sales! It could have been the one thing that numerous customers are annoyed about. There are many ways you can and should do this too!!

A little positive thinking about complaints and feedback can improve your customer service and sales enormously and if you need more help with creativity and a different angle look here!

The Complaining Cow logo, complaints, consultancy, speaker, workshops and more

Bonus tip! Look to become a member of an Alternative Dispute Resolution Scheme. 5 myths about Ombudsman providers busted. Being a member of a scheme can be really beneficial to businesses and it gives consumers faith that there is support if something goes wrong with a purchase. There are some issues with choosing the right scheme Ombudsman systems needs urgent shake-up, says Parliamentary Group  and see Ombudsman Omnishambles and More Ombudsman Omnishambles. These reports look at the approval and ongoing monitoring of ADR providers which will help you choose and in particular avoid. Such as the schemes run by Dean Dunham of Consumer Dispute Resolution Limited.

To see how The Complaining Cow can help you prevent and handle complaint see Services.

Categories
Business Good customer service

The Complaining Cow v Tesco CEO & Executive Team

Oh hello, here for another Tesco story? Well, as followers of this blog know well, Tesco and me? Well we have history shall we say. 🙂 🙂 🙂  The very first blog post was complaining about Tesco. Then there was taking them to court, insects in rice, milk bottles versus cola bottles and then my opinion on why Clarke had to go. Then I met the new chappie, Dave Lewis. Liked him, he bought a hundred of my books (at full price, take that Amazon) for his board and most senior people (time will tell if I continue to like him, he hardly had a difficult act to follow and there’s so much to do) and he invited me back to meet some of the team and have lunch.

Lunch

3 course meal cooked by the senior development chef  Pat Clifford thank you very much, was very good indeed. Guess who was always the last to finish each course because they had the most to say?!

Dave Lewis Lunch Menu v2

I know you don’t want to download the menu but that thing came up and I don’t know how to get rid of it!

Issues

Apparently I am one of Tesco’s most engaged (with them, I don’t have a collection of rings) customers. So who else has had so many dealings with Tesco? Oh, ah, hmmmm. Moving swiftly on….what a jolly nice day out. Couple of hours of giving my opinions again. Fabulous. Can’t remember half of what I said, but here are a few things, as I also shared what many of you complained to me about Tesco that are being/will be addressed…..

  1. All those flipping pieces of paper and coupons you have at the till – they are looking at trying to improve that.
  2. Checkout assistants shouldn’t be asking us if we want carrier bags, just leave them there we aren’t going to take more than we need!
  3. There may be very few of us who are this daft, but you know when you do your shopping online and you order 10 kg bags of carrots or 10 punnets of fruit when you meant 10 single pieces? Told them they need to have something that comes up, “Did you mean to do that?” You can either tell it yes you did thank you very much or cry out your much over used expletive of choice and correct it.
  4. Told them that their triple chocolate cookies from the bakery are good but aren’t as good as Sainsbury’s.
  5. Tell us why something is coming up as not in stock online and the system is suggesting you have this alternative, particularly when it is more expensive!
  6. Wine by the case site as well as Tesco grocery site – don’t put bottles of wine that are out of stock in the offers. That. Really. Annoys me.
  7. Going to be back to chat to the woman in charge of community stuff – too right that will be a few hours with both work hats on!
  8. Sorting out the shelves, one of the most common complaints I hear about Tesco, stuff not on the shelves (or in the freezer)
  9. Improve communications between the social media team and customer service
  10. You’ll like this one. Customer opinions on new products. Did you know that no product goes on the shelves without a bunch of people of people testing and giving their opinions on it? No, nor did I. Did you know that they were looking for loads more people? No, nor did I. Would you ignore such a request? No, nor would I. So, instead of rambling on here even more than usual, I have asked Helen (no, not me I don’t write like that) to write a guest blog post. Coming soon a post about what is involved and how to get on the programme. You’re welcome 🙂

There was some other stuff but that’s commercially sensitive so you’ll have to wait 😛

The guide dog issue

Remember this story? The staff who told the woman she wasn’t allowed the guide dog in the store? Tesco was reported as having given £5,000 to charity and put training in place and that was it. I wasn’t going anywhere without addressing this story and as those of you who follow the blog know, I’m harsh but always fair. (I even thank Tesco in my book for providing such diabolical service which resulted in providing great material for the blog which gained so much interest it encouraged me to write the thing!)

Why on earth would you need to train someone that guide dogs are ok in stores? When the staff didn’t grow up in the UK and they have no knowledge or understanding of guide dogs (or hearing dogs etc.)

I was also going to go into one about how typical of Tesco it was to throw £5k at the problem and run away and why didn’t they buy a dog.  Tesco has bought a puppy. It takes 50k from breeding through training to retirement to pay for a guide dog and they have done that. Due to be born in January I believe.

Payment

Gotta laugh – the cheque for the books had been made payable to “The Complaining Cow”. Don’t actually have an account in that name… hands up all those hoping I don’t get paid so I take them to court again?

Presents

Who doesn’t love presents? Look what I was given to go home with –

I always say reward your complainers - they increase your profits!
I always say reward your complainers – they increase your profits!

Lots of the Tesco finest range but didn’t include my favourite chocolate truffles (ungrateful cow), included an 8 portion luxury Xmas pud (loathe! But OH very pleased) mince pies, chocolate, tea, nuts and cheesy bics.

 

So Tesco has won me over

How very dare you. I won’t stop complaining to Tesco until there is nothing left to complain about. And anyway the spies at Tesco said that I had tweeted Tesco 519 times. Think it’s slightly more than that now! Social media team has promised me this chocolate (they need to change those ball things to red though!) and alcohol when we reach a 1000 so that’s quite a few more complaints to go. And I leave you with one now. I was working late and tried to get link to those chocolate shoes and couldn’t. Black Friday early hours and couldn’t get onto the site. Sort it out Tesco.

Updates

Want to keep up to date on Tesco complaints, The Complaining Cow, tips on complaining, new consumer laws etc? Subscribe to the newsletter. You won’t be inundated, I only get round to sending one every few months!

The Complaining Cow’s history with Tesco gives the links to all the posts old, new and newer than this, covering how it all started, going to court and more.

Case study: Tesco and a consumer champion provides the whole story and should be of interest to you if you fancy improving your service and sales!

Tesco | Complaining Cow meets Dave Lewis and Matt Davies