Peter Kay cancelled shows – your rights

Refunds for cancelled events

Earlier today Peter Kay announced on Twitter that he was cancelling his 18 month tour due to unforeseen family circumstances.

Your rights if you bought tickets for this cancelled event

Refunds for tickets bought from Ticketmaster

Ticketmaster was the official vendor for the live arena tour. It usually refunds tickets automatically including any service charges and it will make the refund to the card you used for payment.

Refunds for tickets bought from a third party seller

StubHub has a FanProtect service so it will refund you the total cost of your order. Seatwave also offers a full refund for cancelled events. Some secondary agents belong to the Association of Secondary Ticket Agents (ASTA) therefore following a code of conduct which includes refunding the full amount in light of cancelled events. Other secondary sites are not members so you will need to check the site for their terms and conditions.

Refunds for tickets bought from social media sites

If you have bought from a Facebook individual/group or a ticket tout you don’t have any rights because the contractual rights for a refund lay with them. Your only chance is if you can trace them and request that they refund you.

Timescales for getting a refund from a cancelled event

You should be refunded from a seller within 30 days but providers may set their own deadlines if overwhelmed. Ticketmaster has said it will refund within 15 days.

Other ways to get a refund for a cancelled event

Credit card. If you paid more than £100 by credit card you will be able to claim from the credit card company using Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act

Paypal. You should be able to get a refund through their Buyer Protection scheme.

Debit card. You may be able to claim through Chargeback. Contact your bank regarding this voluntary scheme.

Telephone costs incurred due to cancelled events

Under the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 traders cannot use a number that is charged at more than the basic rate for after sale enquiries. Numbers starting 084, 087, 090, 091 or 098 are non-geographic numbers. They have an Access Charge set by and paid to the benefit of the caller’s telephone provider and a Service Charge set by and paid to the benefit of the called party and their telecoms provider. They are banned for use in after sales customer services situations. If you have to ring one of these numbers ensure you get the cost of the call refunded. Please let me know in the comments if you have had to ring one of these numbers after sales in the comments below.

The Sun covered these costs in more detail. Peter Kay fans charged up to 62p per minute to call premium rate phone line to claim ticket refunds.

Administration costs you paid for cancelled events

In theory you should get all he costs back but a third party seller may say that it still undertook the service and so is entitled to keep this amount. It is possible that this cost will be kept. Always check terms and conditions when using these sites, although you can try and argue unfair charges and contracts.

Consequential loss from cancelled event

Because there is a breach of contract (Consumer Rights Act 2015) you should be entitled to consequential loss such as travel costs or hotels that you may have booked. In this case there has been so much notice given that it is unlikely that you would have lost out on travel costs or not be able to get the costs of a hotel back. In the unlikely event that you have incurred other costs you should claim under the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

For more information on cancelled events and your rights see All you need to know when an event is cancelled

 

For more information, tips, advice, guidance and consumer laws explore the blog and GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS!

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Kay cancelled shows Your Rights (1)

Bright ideas for complaining about Brighthouse (& avoiding them in the first place!)

How to complain about “pay weekly” chains

BrightHouse is a “pay weekly” chain of shops which is loathed by almost all debt advisers.

This is a guest post by Sara Williams, an adviser at Citizens Advice

Why do debt advisors hate BrightHouse?

Their interest rates are high, but that isn’t the only reason. BrightHouse goods are often much more expensive than a similar TV or washing machine would be from another retailer. In addition they make most people add on expensive insurance.

The result is that you could spend more than £750 paid over three years on a Hoover washing machine, when you could get a very similar model from AO.com at £230.

So far so bad… but these rip off prices are made worse by the fact that BrightHouse has often failed to check properly that its customers can afford the items they are buying. The quoted weekly amounts may sound manageable but most BrightHouse customers are on low income or just benefits.

And BrightHouse goods are sold on Hire Purchase agreements. So customers in the last year of their contract who have financial problems will often be desperate to make the last few BrightHouse payments, rather than lose the item they have already paid so much for. They may get behind with rent, council tax and utility bills or take out expensive credit such as payday loans as a result.electrical items can you get a refund - more than likely

BrightHouse refunds

In October the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), BrightHouse’s regulator, told them to refund a bit under £15 million to two groups of customers:

  1. People who had cancelled a purchase within the 14 day cooling off period but still made 1 payment. These refunds will be small as it’s only 1 week’s payment to be refunded.
  2. 81,000 people who bought something between 1 April 2014 and 30 September 2016 where BrightHouse think they should have done more affordability checks – average refund £125.

If you want to know if you will be getting a refund, call their free helpline: 0800 30 40 80. £15 million sounds good, but in practice not many people are getting them considering the amount of stress and misery BrightHouse has caused.

The FCA took over as BrightHouse’s regulator in 2014, but before then the regulator was the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) and the OFT had the same rules about checking affordability as the FCA has. So I think people with older purchases should also get refunds. And if you had a purchase after 2014 which they aren’t refunding, you can make a complaint that it was unaffordable.

See How to make an affordability complaint to BrightHouse for a template letter and more information about complaining to Brighthouse.

If your purchase was “unaffordable” then you should get a refund of all the interest you paid, plus 8% simple interest and have any negative marks on your credit record deleted.

Other BrightHouse complaints

BrightHouse also have a poor reputation for customer service when something goes wrong – an item doesn’t match its description, or it is faulty.

If you have one of these “consumer complaints”, you have the same legal rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015 as if you bought the goods from a normal shop. See the article on this website that looks at these rights and how to complain – it’s got some useful videos.

Alternatives to BrightHouse

Many people with little money go to BrightHouse because they are desperate. But here are some better alternatives, so check if one might work for you:

  1. Local Welfare Assistance Scheme (used to be called Crisis Loans). These are harder to get now than they used to be, but it’s worth asking your council if they help families to replace things like white goods and essential furniture.
  2. Budgeting loans If you have been on JSA, ESA, Income Support or Universal Credit for more than 6 months, you may be able to get an interest-free budgeting loan.
  3. Credit Union You may be able to join a local one or one linked with your job, eg NHS staff.
  4. Fair For You – this is an online alternative to BrightHouse, offering weekly payments but without the markup on the original prices and their interest rates are lower. Check them out!

About the author Sara Williams

Sara Williams Debt camel guest post on The Complaining Cow

Sar is a CAB advisor who has her owwebsite Debt Camel where she blogs about everything to do with debt and credit ratings. She also guest posted Everything you need to know about Payday loans The only person so far who has written two guest posts on my blog ‘cos she’s sooo good at her stuff!