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Christmas Deliveries Latest News Online shopping and deliveries Topical

10 top tips and consumer advice regarding Xmas returns during the pandemic

Give the unwanted present a better future

Another Christmas has been and gone. Strange as it may have been for many of us, one thing is for sure: some of us received presents we didn’t really want!

So, what are your rights when it comes to returning unwanted Christmas presents? It has become a little more complicated due to Covid. (What hasn’t?)

10 top tips on your rights and what to do with unwanted presents:

10 Top Tips and advice regarding Xmas returns during Covid with three box presents

1) A store does not have to take back an unwanted present. It will depend on the store’s policy as to whether they will accept an item for a refund or a voucher as a goodwill gesture. Many, particularly the large stores, will do this and extend their returns policy timeframe.

2) The contract is always between the purchaser and the retailer. Therefore you will need a gift receipt (which transfers the rights from the purchaser to the gift recipient) or the original receipt.

3) Some larger stores may take an item for a refund without a receipt but remember they don’t have to do this and will offer you the price that the item is currently selling at, so hope it’s not in the sale!

4) If the item is faulty, not as described or hasn’t lasted a reasonable length of time, then it is a breach of the Consumer Rights Act 2015 and you are entitled to a full refund (within 30 days of purchase) or replacement or repair but you will need the proof of purchase.

5) If the item was bought online and you have a gift receipt, you have 14 days from the point of receiving the item to notify the online retailer about returning the item and a further 14 days to return the item. It will depend on the trader’s terms and conditions as to whether you have to pay postage.

6) If the item was bought in store and would normally accept a return but it is closed due to Covid tier restrictions, it is worth emailing the store to notify them and ask what their policy is. You will then have a written record and a reply to inform you of their policy. Many will extend their policies as they try and keep custom.

Presents warpped up n boxes shades of red and brown

7) You could try to return the item that was bought in store via the post but you must arrange this with the retailer and get written confirmation and details of how to do this as many retailers, even (unbelievably!) the larger stores are not set up to do this.

8) A retailer is very likely to give you a refund for an unwanted present on a gift card. Make sure you spend this quickly. In the current climate if a shop sadly goes into administration cards are unlikely to be accepted. Many will last only a year or two too and you may well forget that you have it. Spend it or lose it.

Looking a Gift Card in the Mouth

9) If you can’t return an unwanted gift you can do a number of things: Upcycle, donate to charity, give toiletries and food gifts to a food bank, contact your council social services department to ask to whether unwanted homeware and toys could be donated to a family or toy library, keep for fundraisers and even look at renting! Many people now hire out anything from power tools to baby clothes! More information can be found at What to do with the ghost of Christmas Present?

10) If you intend to regift make sure you make a note of who gave you what, as it is quite common for people to regift something back to the person who gave it to them! Don’t donate to your school fete a present that could easily be noticed by your friend and check for any personal messages on calendars books etc. before donating!

Make this the year the year you have those discussions about reducing the amount you spend on gifts! Raise the conversation later in the year, talk about wastage, giving to charity instead (many people do this instead of sending cards now, so this is just an extension) or just giving to children!

Coronavirus COVID-19 rights, refunds, reschedules for more help and consumer advice on purchases throughout the pandemic.

Here’s to a better 2021 with less wastage and more support for the charities which so desperately need us.

 

What are your rights when returning items at Christmas?

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For a present you won’t want to return! GET THE BOOK! How To Complain: The ESSENTIAL Consumer Guide to Getting REFUNDS, Redress and RESULTS! Full of information, advice, stories, consumer rights and template letters!

 


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And one for the New Year!

101 Habits of an Effective Complainer!

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Deliveries Latest News Topical

Are online shops delivering the goods?

We may be in lockdown but as a nation we’re still doing a lot of shopping. Online, of course! Most of the time that goes smoothly and we get what we ordered on the day we expect it, but sometimes things go wrong.

boxes on shelves

Figures released today from research undertaken by the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) reveal that almost half (47%) of British consumers have had a parcel delivery issue since the first lockdown in March 2020.

The figures show:

  • 96% of people say they’ve ordered an item for delivery since March.
  • The biggest problem consumers face is late delivery, with almost one in three people (30%) across the country facing a delay.
  • Nearly one in five people (18%) who experience a parcel issue also suffered some sort of financial loss, with 40% of those losing over £20.

The CAB’s Consumer Service has received three times as many calls about delivery issues since March compared to the same period last year.

National Consumer Week starts today and the theme is online shopping and your rights.

So what are your rights when shopping off premises?

  • Your rights when purchasing items through an advert or catalogue are exactly the same as buying from any other retailer, so your correspondence about faulty items would be covered under the Consumer Rights Act 2015. In addition, under the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013consumers have 14 days cooling off period for changing their minds. A further 14 days is provided from this date to return the item. There are some exceptions to this such as bespoke items.
  • Whether or not return postage has to be paid depends on the trader’s terms and conditions. If you paid extra for speedier delivery and it wasn’t delivered within this time you are entitled to a refund of the additional charge. If the item is faulty you do not pay return postage and you should receive the full cost of any postage paid for sending the item to you.
  • You are also entitled to any out of pocket expenses if the company don’t turn up when they say they will, such as wages for time off work if you have to arrange another date for delivery.
  • The Consumer Rights Act 2015 also states that goods must be delivered within the time frame agreed with the seller. If one hasn’t been agreed (you have agreed a time frame if the listing supplies a time frame) the trader must deliver ‘without undue delay’ and at the very latest not more than 30 days from the day after the contract is made. After this time you are entitled to a full refund for the item and delivery costs.
  • Deliveries must also be carried out with reasonable skill and care. So, if anything is damaged during the delivery, including on your property, you are entitled to redress.
  • Has a parcel gone missing from the doorstep or your neighbour? By providing details for a “safe place” you are agreeing to it being safe! If there is a chance that it could be stolen then don’t use it as a safe place! This is common sense really! Once the retailer has left the item where you specified then it has become your property. You could possibly try and claim from your insurer. If you did not say the item could be left anywhere then a photo of the item on your door step is not proof that it was delivered. If, for example, some fool has put it in a wheelie bin and it is bin collection day and you don’t get the parcel then it has not been delivered with reasonable skill and care and you are entitled to a full refund.
  • Unless you paid the courier company direct (extremely unlikely when purchasing items online) then your contract is with the retailer. So, when a courier company, let’s call it “Model”, is utterly useless and leaves your package somewhere to be stolen or throws it in the garden breaking the contents, it is always the retailer from whom you claim. Even if they try and fob you offand say contact “Model”, don’t. The retailer can deal with the courier and perhaps when they’ve had enough complaints they’ll drop the contract and use a better firm. If you have difficulties you can go to the CEO of the company to whom you paid the money and find their contact details from com
  • If you need the retailer to pick up the item because it is bulky, put the request in writing (why it is important to write not phone), provide a deadline for when they can pick it up, telling them that otherwise you will dispose of the item.

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For more help, advice, tips, information and templates buy  How to Complain: The Essential Consumer Guide to Getting Refunds, Redress and Results!